Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 PM

Description

Concerns over the detectability of embrittlement in high strength alloys has led to studying a simple anisotropic shell model [1] for grain boundaries decorated by precipitates, or otherwise enriched by segregated inhomogenieties. In this model the shell is presumed to be “spherically orthotropic,” having five independent elastic constants and symmetry about the origin of a spherical coordinate system. This structure is analogous to transversely isotropic materials in a Cartesian coordinate system. By studying ultrasonic scattering from such shells (embedded in an isotropic host, and surrounding an isotropic core), we hope to learn whether their presence could be detected, and differentiated from scattering due to the inherent anisotropy of single metal crystals [2,3].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Development of Standard Techniques

Section

Elastic Wave Scattering

Pages

55-61

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_6

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 PM

Ultrasonic scattering from spherically orthotropic shells

La Jolla, CA

Concerns over the detectability of embrittlement in high strength alloys has led to studying a simple anisotropic shell model [1] for grain boundaries decorated by precipitates, or otherwise enriched by segregated inhomogenieties. In this model the shell is presumed to be “spherically orthotropic,” having five independent elastic constants and symmetry about the origin of a spherical coordinate system. This structure is analogous to transversely isotropic materials in a Cartesian coordinate system. By studying ultrasonic scattering from such shells (embedded in an isotropic host, and surrounding an isotropic core), we hope to learn whether their presence could be detected, and differentiated from scattering due to the inherent anisotropy of single metal crystals [2,3].