Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 PM

Description

Perhaps the greatest fundamental deterrent to the application of current laser ultrasonic technology has been the fact that the detection sensitivity or detectability of laser receiver systems, compared with their piezoelectric counterparts, is rather poor. That is to say that in general, and especially on a dollar-for-dollar basis, piezoelectric transducers are able to detect much smaller surface displacements than can easily be detected by laser methods. As will be discussed shortly, there are several strategies which may be used to overcome these detectability shortcomings. Indeed, several of these strategies have been investigated at the laboratory level and some implemented in full-scale systems which have been demonstrated to perform reliably and with good detectability even in an industrial or field inspection application [1]. In this latter case, however, the successful strategy pursued to improve laser ultrasonic detectability limits has not been inexpensive in terms of the cost of laser equipment necessary to reach satisfactory performance levels. Nevertheless, there are several inspection and process control applications where critical structural and materials property information can only be obtained by remote noncontact ultrasonic inspection, thus justifying the expense of such a sensor system.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Emerging Inspection Technologies

Section

Laser-Based Ultrasonics

Pages

517-526

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_66

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 PM

Source efficiency and sensor detectability factors in laser ultrasonics

La Jolla, CA

Perhaps the greatest fundamental deterrent to the application of current laser ultrasonic technology has been the fact that the detection sensitivity or detectability of laser receiver systems, compared with their piezoelectric counterparts, is rather poor. That is to say that in general, and especially on a dollar-for-dollar basis, piezoelectric transducers are able to detect much smaller surface displacements than can easily be detected by laser methods. As will be discussed shortly, there are several strategies which may be used to overcome these detectability shortcomings. Indeed, several of these strategies have been investigated at the laboratory level and some implemented in full-scale systems which have been demonstrated to perform reliably and with good detectability even in an industrial or field inspection application [1]. In this latter case, however, the successful strategy pursued to improve laser ultrasonic detectability limits has not been inexpensive in terms of the cost of laser equipment necessary to reach satisfactory performance levels. Nevertheless, there are several inspection and process control applications where critical structural and materials property information can only be obtained by remote noncontact ultrasonic inspection, thus justifying the expense of such a sensor system.