Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 PM

Description

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the premier tool for the non-destructive evaluation of soft tissue in living systems [1]. Established liquid-state MRI strategies are generally found to be inappropriate for the imaging of rigid solids, because the linewidth for nuclear magnetic resonance in solids is orders-of-magnitude larger than in liquids. Methods currently under development for the NMR imaging of solids either involve the use of very large (fringe-field) magnetic field gradients to encode spatial information over very short periods of time [2], or employ multiple-pulse line-narrowing techniques that prolong a solid’s apparent transverse relaxation time [3–7]. In the latter methods, the magnetic field gradients may be much weaker, but must generally be pulsed synchronously with the line-narrowing sequence. The benefits of implementing this are improved sensitivity and spectroscopic resolution.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Emerging Inspection Technologies

Section

Magnetic Resonance Methods

Pages

687-694

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_87

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 PM

Advances in pultiple-pulse radio-frequency-gradient imaging of solids

La Jolla, CA

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the premier tool for the non-destructive evaluation of soft tissue in living systems [1]. Established liquid-state MRI strategies are generally found to be inappropriate for the imaging of rigid solids, because the linewidth for nuclear magnetic resonance in solids is orders-of-magnitude larger than in liquids. Methods currently under development for the NMR imaging of solids either involve the use of very large (fringe-field) magnetic field gradients to encode spatial information over very short periods of time [2], or employ multiple-pulse line-narrowing techniques that prolong a solid’s apparent transverse relaxation time [3–7]. In the latter methods, the magnetic field gradients may be much weaker, but must generally be pulsed synchronously with the line-narrowing sequence. The benefits of implementing this are improved sensitivity and spectroscopic resolution.