Location

Snowmass Village, CO

Start Date

1-1-1995 12:00 AM

Description

The acoustic microscope, which utilizes focused ultrasound at hundreds of megahertz or even a few gigahertz, can have comparable wavelength and therefore resolution with the optical microscope since the velocity of ultrasound is five orders lower than that of light in fluid media [1, 2]. Since the appearance of the first acoustic microscope [3], extensive research has been devoted to its applications in the nondestructive testing of materials. With this instrument high contrast micrographs can be obtained which contain unique information not available in other imaging tools and the elastic properties of optically opaque materials can be determined. It is particularly suitable for detecting surface and subsurface defects in metal and ceramic materials and for examining integrated circuits and biological cells.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

14A

Chapter

Chapter 4: Transducers, Sensors, and Process Control

Section

Ultrasonic Transducer Fields and Ray Tracing

Pages

1045-1052

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-1987-4_132

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Wave Analysis for the Acoustic Microscope

Snowmass Village, CO

The acoustic microscope, which utilizes focused ultrasound at hundreds of megahertz or even a few gigahertz, can have comparable wavelength and therefore resolution with the optical microscope since the velocity of ultrasound is five orders lower than that of light in fluid media [1, 2]. Since the appearance of the first acoustic microscope [3], extensive research has been devoted to its applications in the nondestructive testing of materials. With this instrument high contrast micrographs can be obtained which contain unique information not available in other imaging tools and the elastic properties of optically opaque materials can be determined. It is particularly suitable for detecting surface and subsurface defects in metal and ceramic materials and for examining integrated circuits and biological cells.