Location

Snowmass Village, CO

Start Date

1-1-1995 12:00 AM

Description

Fiber optic sensors are emerging as important new tools in the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). They offer a number of advantages over sensing elements traditionally used in NDE applications such as resistive foil strain gauges and piezoelectric transducers. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over traditional NDE sensors include: ease of embedding in composite materials, good mechanical interaction between the embedded sensor and the host structure, insensitivity to electrical interference, and fine spatial resolution [1]. Additionally, fiber optic sensors can be configured to detect a variety of fields from large slowly varying thermal and mechanical strains, to ultrasound and acoustic emission. They have shown potential in a variety of material systems such as graphite/epoxy composites [2], titanium matrix composites [3], aluminum [4], and concrete [5]. They have also been embedded in a number of practical structures including airplanes [6][7], buildings [8][9], and dams [10].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

14A

Chapter

Chapter 4: Transducers, Sensors, and Process Control

Section

Sensors and Process Control

Pages

1135-1142

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-1987-4_144

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Stabilized Fiber Optic Sensor for Ultrasound Detection

Snowmass Village, CO

Fiber optic sensors are emerging as important new tools in the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). They offer a number of advantages over sensing elements traditionally used in NDE applications such as resistive foil strain gauges and piezoelectric transducers. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over traditional NDE sensors include: ease of embedding in composite materials, good mechanical interaction between the embedded sensor and the host structure, insensitivity to electrical interference, and fine spatial resolution [1]. Additionally, fiber optic sensors can be configured to detect a variety of fields from large slowly varying thermal and mechanical strains, to ultrasound and acoustic emission. They have shown potential in a variety of material systems such as graphite/epoxy composites [2], titanium matrix composites [3], aluminum [4], and concrete [5]. They have also been embedded in a number of practical structures including airplanes [6][7], buildings [8][9], and dams [10].