Location

Snowmass Village, CO

Start Date

1-1-1995 12:00 AM

Description

Conventional piezoelectric based ultrasonic systems have been extensively employed for material characterization. These systems however, have been challenged by the recent need to rapidly scan large areas of new materials such as composites having complex geometry. A promising candidate addressing this issue is laser ultrasonics. Though laser ultrasonics is not new and has generated considerable research interest in the past two decades, its industrial acceptance has been limited. Among its many benefits, laser ultrasonics promise the flexibility of a couplant free inspection system. Pulsed lasers, in particular, offer energy concentration at high repetition rates which can be readily directed at any location on the specimen for interrogation purposes. The detection of laser ultrasound is usually done through Michaelson or Fabry-Perot type interferometric systems. Though these detection systems have the advantage of couplant free detection, they constitute a major component of system cost owing to the precision required. The sensitivity of such systems are also not satisfactory.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

14A

Chapter

Chapter 4: Transducers, Sensors, and Process Control

Section

Sensors and Process Control

Pages

1197-1204

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-1987-4_152

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

A Hybrid Laser Ultrasonic Based Systemf ro Composite Molding

Snowmass Village, CO

Conventional piezoelectric based ultrasonic systems have been extensively employed for material characterization. These systems however, have been challenged by the recent need to rapidly scan large areas of new materials such as composites having complex geometry. A promising candidate addressing this issue is laser ultrasonics. Though laser ultrasonics is not new and has generated considerable research interest in the past two decades, its industrial acceptance has been limited. Among its many benefits, laser ultrasonics promise the flexibility of a couplant free inspection system. Pulsed lasers, in particular, offer energy concentration at high repetition rates which can be readily directed at any location on the specimen for interrogation purposes. The detection of laser ultrasound is usually done through Michaelson or Fabry-Perot type interferometric systems. Though these detection systems have the advantage of couplant free detection, they constitute a major component of system cost owing to the precision required. The sensitivity of such systems are also not satisfactory.