Location

Snowmass Village, CO

Start Date

1-1-1995 12:00 AM

Description

In this paper, a recently developed revolutionary approach to material characterization for application to the development of advanced composite materials is presented. A methodology of fiber-matrix interface characterization has been recently developed based on the shear back reflectivity technique. This new methodology uses ultrasonic waves to nondestructively evaluate the interfacial elastic properties at a localized level. This new approach is nondestructive in nature in contrast to traditional destructive characterization techniques which are costly, time consuming, tedious and which also render the samples unusable for other experiments. Based on this interface characterization methodology, an original, unique, innovative method of imaging fiber microcracking has been developed to augment standard experiments such as fiber fragmentation, transverse loading, fiber-push tests, etc., conducted by scientists developing advanced composites. This provides critical information to materials researchers for micro-mechanics modeling studies to evaluate fracture and fatigue behavior of composites. Further, the methodology is used to assist and enhance the traditional experiments such as fiber fragmentation tests for interfacial shear load transfer behavior studies, fiber push tests for interfacial factional and fracture behavior studies, transverse loading tests for interfacial stress at fracture, etc. Thus, the nondestructive ultrasonic technique has been shown here to extend the horizons of material behavior studies by providing new information obtained during in situ testing or in an interrupted mode. Moreover, the new technique alleviate the need for traditional destructive characterization work such as optical metallography. The entirely new information provided by this breakthrough technique is now extensively used by materials behavior groups at the WL / Materials Directorate (WL/ML) for determination of the basic mechanisms of damage in composites to improve both the processing and the reliability of the experimental characterization of the materials.

Volume

14B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Engineered Materials

Section

Interfaces

Pages

1449-1456

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-1987-4_186

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Theoretical Modeling and Experimental Characterization of Fiber-Matrix Interface in Advanced Composites

Snowmass Village, CO

In this paper, a recently developed revolutionary approach to material characterization for application to the development of advanced composite materials is presented. A methodology of fiber-matrix interface characterization has been recently developed based on the shear back reflectivity technique. This new methodology uses ultrasonic waves to nondestructively evaluate the interfacial elastic properties at a localized level. This new approach is nondestructive in nature in contrast to traditional destructive characterization techniques which are costly, time consuming, tedious and which also render the samples unusable for other experiments. Based on this interface characterization methodology, an original, unique, innovative method of imaging fiber microcracking has been developed to augment standard experiments such as fiber fragmentation, transverse loading, fiber-push tests, etc., conducted by scientists developing advanced composites. This provides critical information to materials researchers for micro-mechanics modeling studies to evaluate fracture and fatigue behavior of composites. Further, the methodology is used to assist and enhance the traditional experiments such as fiber fragmentation tests for interfacial shear load transfer behavior studies, fiber push tests for interfacial factional and fracture behavior studies, transverse loading tests for interfacial stress at fracture, etc. Thus, the nondestructive ultrasonic technique has been shown here to extend the horizons of material behavior studies by providing new information obtained during in situ testing or in an interrupted mode. Moreover, the new technique alleviate the need for traditional destructive characterization work such as optical metallography. The entirely new information provided by this breakthrough technique is now extensively used by materials behavior groups at the WL / Materials Directorate (WL/ML) for determination of the basic mechanisms of damage in composites to improve both the processing and the reliability of the experimental characterization of the materials.