Location

Snowmass Village, CO

Start Date

1-1-1995 12:00 AM

Description

Current concern for ensuring the air-worthiness of the aging commercial air fleet has prompted the establishment of broad-agency programs to develop NDT technologies that address specific aging-aircraft issues.[1, 2] One of the crucial technological needs that has been identified is the development of rapid, quantitative systems for depot-level inspection of bonded aluminum lap joints on aircraft.[1–3] Research results for characterization of disbond and corrosion based on normal-incidence pulse-echo measurement geometries are showing promise, but are limited by the single-site nature of the measurement which requires manual or mechanical scanning to inspect an area. [4–7] One approach to developing efficient systems may be to transfer specific aspects of current medical imaging technology to the NDT arena. Ultrasonic medical imaging systems offer many desirable attributes for large scale inspection. They are portable, provide real-time imaging, and have integrated video tape recorder and printer capabilities available for documentation and post-inspection review. Furthermore, these systems are available at a relatively low cost (approximately $50,000 to $200,000) and can be optimized for use with metals with straight-forward modifications. As an example, ultrasonic phased-array and linear array imaging technology, which was first developed for use in the medical industry, has been successfully implemented for some NDT applications by other investigators. [8–10]

Volume

14B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Engineered Materials

Section

Bonded Joints

Pages

1513-1520

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-1987-4_194

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Detection of Disbonded Regions in Bonded Aluminum Plates Using an Ultrasonic 7.5 Mhz Linear Array medical Imaging System

Snowmass Village, CO

Current concern for ensuring the air-worthiness of the aging commercial air fleet has prompted the establishment of broad-agency programs to develop NDT technologies that address specific aging-aircraft issues.[1, 2] One of the crucial technological needs that has been identified is the development of rapid, quantitative systems for depot-level inspection of bonded aluminum lap joints on aircraft.[1–3] Research results for characterization of disbond and corrosion based on normal-incidence pulse-echo measurement geometries are showing promise, but are limited by the single-site nature of the measurement which requires manual or mechanical scanning to inspect an area. [4–7] One approach to developing efficient systems may be to transfer specific aspects of current medical imaging technology to the NDT arena. Ultrasonic medical imaging systems offer many desirable attributes for large scale inspection. They are portable, provide real-time imaging, and have integrated video tape recorder and printer capabilities available for documentation and post-inspection review. Furthermore, these systems are available at a relatively low cost (approximately $50,000 to $200,000) and can be optimized for use with metals with straight-forward modifications. As an example, ultrasonic phased-array and linear array imaging technology, which was first developed for use in the medical industry, has been successfully implemented for some NDT applications by other investigators. [8–10]