Location

Snowmass Village, CO

Start Date

1-1-1995 12:00 AM

Description

Corrosion is one of the most important factors limiting life-extension of aircraft in both commercial and military fleets. Non-destructive methods for characterizing damage caused by hidden corrosion in layered structures such as aircraft lap-splices are, consequently, a high priority for commercial airlines and the Department of Defense. A considerable effort is underway to develop new eddy-current techniques for detecting and characterizing hidden corrosion. Eddy-currents have the advantage of penetrating into subsurface layers and therefore being sensitive to their condition, whether or not the layers are mechanically bonded. In contrast, ultrasonic techniques require a mechanical bond between layers for the ultrasonic energy to penetrate to the second or third layers. Both time-domain [1,2] (pulsed) and frequency-domain [3,4] (continuous wave) methods are under development.

Volume

14B

Chapter

Chapter 7: Materials' Degradation and Specific Applications

Section

Corrosion

Pages

2065-2072

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-1987-4_264

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Pulsed Eddy-Current Measurements of Corrosion-Induced Metal Loss: Theory and Experiment

Snowmass Village, CO

Corrosion is one of the most important factors limiting life-extension of aircraft in both commercial and military fleets. Non-destructive methods for characterizing damage caused by hidden corrosion in layered structures such as aircraft lap-splices are, consequently, a high priority for commercial airlines and the Department of Defense. A considerable effort is underway to develop new eddy-current techniques for detecting and characterizing hidden corrosion. Eddy-currents have the advantage of penetrating into subsurface layers and therefore being sensitive to their condition, whether or not the layers are mechanically bonded. In contrast, ultrasonic techniques require a mechanical bond between layers for the ultrasonic energy to penetrate to the second or third layers. Both time-domain [1,2] (pulsed) and frequency-domain [3,4] (continuous wave) methods are under development.