Location

Snowmass Village, CO

Start Date

1-1-1995 12:00 AM

Description

An ultrasonic inspection system has been in pilot operation in a titanium plant to demonstrate higher sensitivity testing of titanium alloy billet [1]. The cylindrical billets are up to 20 feet long and from 6 to 13 inches diameter, forged to size from an ingot of approximately 30 inches diameter. The surfaces are prepared by peeling to remove the rough surface produced by the forging process. The material is subsequently cut into shorter lengths and forged to shape for machining into aircraft engine disks. It is desirable to perform ultrasonic inspection of the billet at the highest practicable sensitivity to eliminate melt-related inclusions [2]. The conventional billet inspection currently practiced by most test facilities in the United States uses a single cylindrically focused transducer to test the total volume [3]. The inspection sensitivity is limited by material noise, which is high due to the non-optimum focusing. The Multizone ultrasonic test achieves improved sensitivity by the use of bi-cylindrically focused transducers, each interrogating a limited depth zone of the billet [1]. Rotational and axial positions are encoded, and pulse-echo mode amplitude data are digitized, displayed in C-scan format, and stored.

Volume

14B

Chapter

Chapter 7: Materials' Degradation and Specific Applications

Section

Hard Alpha in Titanium

Pages

2145-2151

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-1987-4_274

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Operational Performance of a Multizone Billet Inspection System

Snowmass Village, CO

An ultrasonic inspection system has been in pilot operation in a titanium plant to demonstrate higher sensitivity testing of titanium alloy billet [1]. The cylindrical billets are up to 20 feet long and from 6 to 13 inches diameter, forged to size from an ingot of approximately 30 inches diameter. The surfaces are prepared by peeling to remove the rough surface produced by the forging process. The material is subsequently cut into shorter lengths and forged to shape for machining into aircraft engine disks. It is desirable to perform ultrasonic inspection of the billet at the highest practicable sensitivity to eliminate melt-related inclusions [2]. The conventional billet inspection currently practiced by most test facilities in the United States uses a single cylindrically focused transducer to test the total volume [3]. The inspection sensitivity is limited by material noise, which is high due to the non-optimum focusing. The Multizone ultrasonic test achieves improved sensitivity by the use of bi-cylindrically focused transducers, each interrogating a limited depth zone of the billet [1]. Rotational and axial positions are encoded, and pulse-echo mode amplitude data are digitized, displayed in C-scan format, and stored.