Location

Snowmass Village, CO

Start Date

1-1-1995 12:00 AM

Description

Imaging objects embedded in lossy inhomogeneous media has a considerable range of applications in the domains of ground-probing practices and nondestructive evaluation of civil engineering structures. The most common problems encountered in these practices are the strong clutter noise [1], and, in many situations, the unknown host medium properties at the time of the measurement. Conventionally, a separate measurement in advance is required for providing information regarding the host medium. For example, an additional reflectometric measurement can be used to retrieve the permittivity of the host material. However, this exercise may not be feasible or practical in many applications. Consequently, most of the probing radar practices are performed with sensors placed very close or in contact with the surface to minimize the interference from strong surface echoes. But such an arrangement cannot be applied while there is no convenient access to the proximity of the host structure.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

14A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Emerging Inspection Technologies

Section

Microwaves

Pages

607-613

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-1987-4_74

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Coherent Microwave Imaging for Buried

Snowmass Village, CO

Imaging objects embedded in lossy inhomogeneous media has a considerable range of applications in the domains of ground-probing practices and nondestructive evaluation of civil engineering structures. The most common problems encountered in these practices are the strong clutter noise [1], and, in many situations, the unknown host medium properties at the time of the measurement. Conventionally, a separate measurement in advance is required for providing information regarding the host medium. For example, an additional reflectometric measurement can be used to retrieve the permittivity of the host material. However, this exercise may not be feasible or practical in many applications. Consequently, most of the probing radar practices are performed with sensors placed very close or in contact with the surface to minimize the interference from strong surface echoes. But such an arrangement cannot be applied while there is no convenient access to the proximity of the host structure.