Location

Snowmass Village, CO

Start Date

1-1-1995 12:00 AM

Description

The detection of surface breaking defects in conducting materials is an important aspect of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Eddy current NDE methods have been used effectively for the detection of fatigue cracks and other surface breaking flaws in conducting materials [1], however, a detracting characteristic is that the eddy current transducer must be placed in close proximity to the test specimen. Since millimeter wave energy can propagate in air and does not require a couplant, millimeter wave NDE offers an alternative technique with the significant advantage of detection in a stand off mode of operation. Millimeter wave NDE has been shown to be effective at detecting small cracks [2–3], however, some methods under study require that the transducer be in close proximity with the specimen and thus suffer from the same disadvantages as eddy current techniques. This paper compares the detection capabilities of surface breaking flaws on conducting materials for millimeter wave NDE in the stand off mode and conventional eddy current NDE.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

14A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Emerging Inspection Technologies

Section

Microwaves

Pages

629-636

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-1987-4_77

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

A Comparison of Millimeter Wave and Eddy Current Detection of Surface Breaking Defects in Conducting Materials

Snowmass Village, CO

The detection of surface breaking defects in conducting materials is an important aspect of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Eddy current NDE methods have been used effectively for the detection of fatigue cracks and other surface breaking flaws in conducting materials [1], however, a detracting characteristic is that the eddy current transducer must be placed in close proximity to the test specimen. Since millimeter wave energy can propagate in air and does not require a couplant, millimeter wave NDE offers an alternative technique with the significant advantage of detection in a stand off mode of operation. Millimeter wave NDE has been shown to be effective at detecting small cracks [2–3], however, some methods under study require that the transducer be in close proximity with the specimen and thus suffer from the same disadvantages as eddy current techniques. This paper compares the detection capabilities of surface breaking flaws on conducting materials for millimeter wave NDE in the stand off mode and conventional eddy current NDE.