Location

Snowmass Village, CO

Start Date

1-1-1995 12:00 AM

Description

The goal of this work is to develop and implement a technology capability for providing cost-effective and rapid geometry evaluation of parts and processes. We were motivated by the new availability of fully three dimensional nondestructive CT scanning for a variety of manufactured parts and assemblies on a rapid and cost-effective basis, with resolutions commensurate with the tolerances required for a variety of manufacturing processes. High-speed, high-quality three dimensional scanning can be accomplished on a overnight service basis for a variety of objects, for costs ranging from a few hundreds to a few thousands of dollars. The resulting images contain quantitative information relating the local x-ray density of scanned objects at every voxel in a three dimensional raster space. There have been significant advances in methods for quantitative volumetric processing and information extraction from these images. However, for many manufacturing process verification applications, the resulting three dimensional images contain more information than can be effectively handled by many end users, particularly when the size of the 3D image data files (often larger than 1 Gbyte) is considered.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

14A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Emerging Inspection Technologies

Section

CT and Laminography

Pages

651-656

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-1987-4_80

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Effective 3D Geometry Extraction and Reverse CAD Modeling

Snowmass Village, CO

The goal of this work is to develop and implement a technology capability for providing cost-effective and rapid geometry evaluation of parts and processes. We were motivated by the new availability of fully three dimensional nondestructive CT scanning for a variety of manufactured parts and assemblies on a rapid and cost-effective basis, with resolutions commensurate with the tolerances required for a variety of manufacturing processes. High-speed, high-quality three dimensional scanning can be accomplished on a overnight service basis for a variety of objects, for costs ranging from a few hundreds to a few thousands of dollars. The resulting images contain quantitative information relating the local x-ray density of scanned objects at every voxel in a three dimensional raster space. There have been significant advances in methods for quantitative volumetric processing and information extraction from these images. However, for many manufacturing process verification applications, the resulting three dimensional images contain more information than can be effectively handled by many end users, particularly when the size of the 3D image data files (often larger than 1 Gbyte) is considered.