Location

Seattle, WA

Start Date

1-1-1996 12:00 AM

Description

Many ultrasonic techniques, such as conventional acoustic emission [1], waveform-based acoustic emission [2] and ultrasonic testing of high-stiffness reinforcing fibers [3], require highly sensitive, broadband, displacement transducers. Optical probes, such as interferometers, offer both large dynamic range and a very wide bandwidth, but do not exhibit the sensitivity needed for such applications [4, 5]. Piezoelectrics, on the other hand, have approximately 40 dB higher sensitivity than optical probes and can be designed to exhibit an acceptably wide bandwidth [6, 7]. In our applications we typically use transducers that exhibit flat frequency response from 10 kHz to 1 MHz on metals. This paper details a procedure by which the noise floor of one of our “HFHS”, piezoelectric transducers can be measured and compared to a model.

Volume

15A

Chapter

Chapter 4: NDE Sensors

Section

Ultrasonic Transducers (Liquid Coupled)

Pages

939-945

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0383-1_123

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Determination of the Absolute Sensitivity Limit of a Piezoelectric Displacement Transducer

Seattle, WA

Many ultrasonic techniques, such as conventional acoustic emission [1], waveform-based acoustic emission [2] and ultrasonic testing of high-stiffness reinforcing fibers [3], require highly sensitive, broadband, displacement transducers. Optical probes, such as interferometers, offer both large dynamic range and a very wide bandwidth, but do not exhibit the sensitivity needed for such applications [4, 5]. Piezoelectrics, on the other hand, have approximately 40 dB higher sensitivity than optical probes and can be designed to exhibit an acceptably wide bandwidth [6, 7]. In our applications we typically use transducers that exhibit flat frequency response from 10 kHz to 1 MHz on metals. This paper details a procedure by which the noise floor of one of our “HFHS”, piezoelectric transducers can be measured and compared to a model.