Location

Seattle, WA

Start Date

1-1-1996 12:00 AM

Description

One aspect of successful composite design involves development of a detailed knowledge of damage evolution. In metal matrix composites, cracking and/or plastic deformation of one or more constituents together with fiber-matrix interfacial debonding and sliding generally occur prior to catastrophic failure [1, 2]. The nature and severity of these damage processes controls mechanical performance. In ductile matrix systems having a low fiber-matrix interfacial strength, the failure process can involve successive fragmentation of the fibers with increasing load. Broken fibers shed load (equally among the unbroken fibers in the case of global load sharing) until the fiber fracture density reaches some critical value and the sample catastrophically fails. Characterization of damage development has been slowed by a lack of NDE techniques. Here, the use of acoustic emission (AE) techniques is explored to further understand and quantify failure processes of this type.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

15B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Engineered Materials

Section

Composite Properties

Pages

1207-1214

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0383-1_157

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Acoustic Emission Analysis of SCS-6 Fiber Fracture in Titanium Matrix Composites

Seattle, WA

One aspect of successful composite design involves development of a detailed knowledge of damage evolution. In metal matrix composites, cracking and/or plastic deformation of one or more constituents together with fiber-matrix interfacial debonding and sliding generally occur prior to catastrophic failure [1, 2]. The nature and severity of these damage processes controls mechanical performance. In ductile matrix systems having a low fiber-matrix interfacial strength, the failure process can involve successive fragmentation of the fibers with increasing load. Broken fibers shed load (equally among the unbroken fibers in the case of global load sharing) until the fiber fracture density reaches some critical value and the sample catastrophically fails. Characterization of damage development has been slowed by a lack of NDE techniques. Here, the use of acoustic emission (AE) techniques is explored to further understand and quantify failure processes of this type.