Location

Seattle, WA

Start Date

1-1-1996 12:00 AM

Description

Since first developed by Lemons and Quate in 1973 [1], scanning acoustic microscopy has been able to obtain images comparable to those from a high quality optical microscope [2]. In the meantime, many investigators [3–7] have developed that technology to determine the microscopic properties of materials. Among those developments, the line-focus-beam (LFB) acoustic microscopy work of Kushibiki and Chubachi [6–7] in the early 1980’s has been most widely recognized [8–10]. Since the LFB technique is a directional measurement, it can be used to study material anisotropy and stress.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

15B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Linear Elastic and Nonlinear Properties

Pages

1431-1438

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0383-1_187

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Materials Characterization by a Time-Resolved and Polarization-Sensitive Ultrasonic Technique

Seattle, WA

Since first developed by Lemons and Quate in 1973 [1], scanning acoustic microscopy has been able to obtain images comparable to those from a high quality optical microscope [2]. In the meantime, many investigators [3–7] have developed that technology to determine the microscopic properties of materials. Among those developments, the line-focus-beam (LFB) acoustic microscopy work of Kushibiki and Chubachi [6–7] in the early 1980’s has been most widely recognized [8–10]. Since the LFB technique is a directional measurement, it can be used to study material anisotropy and stress.