Location

Seattle, WA

Start Date

1-1-1996 12:00 AM

Description

While most thermal NDE methods concentrate on defect detection and imaging, time-resolved infrared radiometry (TRIR) [1,2,3] has also been used successfully to determine material parameters such as thermal diffusivity and thickness. This has allowed information about material structure such as presence of corrosion, porosity or voids to be obtained. In the TRIR technique, the surface temperature of a sample is monitored via infrared emission during application of a heating pulse from an optical, microwave or induction source. Smaller heating intensities result with this technique as compared to the more common short pulse methods [4,5]. Furthermore, the early time behavior in the temperature-time response allows a self calibration to be performed for each pixel in the image, thus removing emissivity and heating beam intensity variations. The development of infrared focalplane arrays with their full field imaging capabilities at high speeds and current image processing equipment allows the TRIR algorithms which have so far have been used only on single point measurements to be applied to full images.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

15B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Coatings

Pages

1551-1558

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0383-1_203

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Time Resolved Infrared Radiometry for Subsurface Interface Imaging

Seattle, WA

While most thermal NDE methods concentrate on defect detection and imaging, time-resolved infrared radiometry (TRIR) [1,2,3] has also been used successfully to determine material parameters such as thermal diffusivity and thickness. This has allowed information about material structure such as presence of corrosion, porosity or voids to be obtained. In the TRIR technique, the surface temperature of a sample is monitored via infrared emission during application of a heating pulse from an optical, microwave or induction source. Smaller heating intensities result with this technique as compared to the more common short pulse methods [4,5]. Furthermore, the early time behavior in the temperature-time response allows a self calibration to be performed for each pixel in the image, thus removing emissivity and heating beam intensity variations. The development of infrared focalplane arrays with their full field imaging capabilities at high speeds and current image processing equipment allows the TRIR algorithms which have so far have been used only on single point measurements to be applied to full images.