Location

Seattle, WA

Start Date

1-1-1996 12:00 AM

Description

Many researchers have used Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements to examine surface and subsurface material properties, in the ultrasonic frequency range below 50 MHz, using contact transducers in a pitch-catch mode configuration, e.g. [1–4]. Unfortunately there are many potential sources of error which can lead to poor measurement reproducibility and low accuracy. This poor reproducibility, and the often stringent requirement for measurement accuracy, have been obstacles to the more wide spread use of Rayleigh wave dispersion and time of flight measurements in industrial settings [3].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

15B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Coatings

Pages

1597-1604

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0383-1_209

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Surface Elastic Wave Measurements for Determination of Steel Hardness Gradients

Seattle, WA

Many researchers have used Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements to examine surface and subsurface material properties, in the ultrasonic frequency range below 50 MHz, using contact transducers in a pitch-catch mode configuration, e.g. [1–4]. Unfortunately there are many potential sources of error which can lead to poor measurement reproducibility and low accuracy. This poor reproducibility, and the often stringent requirement for measurement accuracy, have been obstacles to the more wide spread use of Rayleigh wave dispersion and time of flight measurements in industrial settings [3].