Location

Seattle, WA

Start Date

1-1-1996 12:00 AM

Description

Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) can offer increased specific strength and stiffness, increased toughness, and an ability to operate at high temperatures. However, the mechanical properties of MMCs can be greatly influenced by residual stresses that result during fabrication from the differences in coefficients of thermal expansion of the constituents [1]. There are a number of non-destructive techniques for measuring residual stresses in these types of composites. The two most widely used techniques are x-ray and neutron diffraction. The x-ray diffraction technique is limited in that it has small penetration depths and beam sizes which are generally much greater than the reinforcement diameter. Although the neutron diffraction technique can provide through-thickness measurements, the availability of the specialized test equipment is a limitation, due to the necessity for using a neutron source [2]. An alternative technique for measuring residual stresses is using ultrasound.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

15B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Residual Stress and Texture

Pages

1637-1644

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0383-1_214

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Acoustoelastic Measurement of Second- and Third-Order Elastic Constants in Silicon Carbide and Alumina Particulate-Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

Seattle, WA

Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) can offer increased specific strength and stiffness, increased toughness, and an ability to operate at high temperatures. However, the mechanical properties of MMCs can be greatly influenced by residual stresses that result during fabrication from the differences in coefficients of thermal expansion of the constituents [1]. There are a number of non-destructive techniques for measuring residual stresses in these types of composites. The two most widely used techniques are x-ray and neutron diffraction. The x-ray diffraction technique is limited in that it has small penetration depths and beam sizes which are generally much greater than the reinforcement diameter. Although the neutron diffraction technique can provide through-thickness measurements, the availability of the specialized test equipment is a limitation, due to the necessity for using a neutron source [2]. An alternative technique for measuring residual stresses is using ultrasound.