Location

Seattle, WA

Start Date

1-1-1996 12:00 AM

Description

The near coincidence of the guided wave modes of a plate with zeroes of the reflection coefficient has been used often in the past [1–4] to estimate the plate’s guided wave mode spectrum. Schoch [5] in his quantitative treatment of acoustic reflection from plates expresses the reflected field as a one-dimensional spectral integral over the incident field weighted by the reflection coefficient (RC) and by a propagator term which accounts for diffraction in the incident plane. Bertoni and Tamir [6] later evaluated this integral approximately for an incident Gaussian beam in their analysis of leaky Rayleigh waves. This procedure was later extended to reflection from plates, by Pitts, et al. [7]. Comparisons between numerical or analytical evaluations of this integral formulation of the reflected field and experimental measurements have been made by several authors. A missing element in essentially all these prior treatments, however, is a rigorous analysis of the influence of the receiving transducer.

Volume

15A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Standard Techniques

Section

UT Guided Wave Propagation

Pages

177-184

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0383-1_22

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Geometry and Diffraction Effects in Acoustic Beam Reflection Studies from a Fluid-Loaded Plate

Seattle, WA

The near coincidence of the guided wave modes of a plate with zeroes of the reflection coefficient has been used often in the past [1–4] to estimate the plate’s guided wave mode spectrum. Schoch [5] in his quantitative treatment of acoustic reflection from plates expresses the reflected field as a one-dimensional spectral integral over the incident field weighted by the reflection coefficient (RC) and by a propagator term which accounts for diffraction in the incident plane. Bertoni and Tamir [6] later evaluated this integral approximately for an incident Gaussian beam in their analysis of leaky Rayleigh waves. This procedure was later extended to reflection from plates, by Pitts, et al. [7]. Comparisons between numerical or analytical evaluations of this integral formulation of the reflected field and experimental measurements have been made by several authors. A missing element in essentially all these prior treatments, however, is a rigorous analysis of the influence of the receiving transducer.