Location

Seattle, WA

Start Date

1-1-1996 12:00 AM

Description

Thermal wave imaging is emerging as a strong competitor to conventional nondestructive aircraft inspection techniques. Its strengths are in its ability to do rapid, wide-area, contactless imaging to detect corrosion and disbonding. It readily lends itself to the inspection of both metallic and composite aircraft structures. Recently [1], we have described the evolution of thermal wave hardware, and the role of the FAA’s NDI Validation Center in that evolution. In this report, we provide illustrative thermal wave images which show corrosion and disbonding on the B737 testbed aircraft at the NDI Validation Center. By showing sequences of images at successive times after the pulse-heating of the aircraft surface, we show that the greatest detail of subsurface corrosion occurs at very early times, thus mandating the use of rapid imaging techniques. More detailed laboratory studies confirming this conclusion are provided in a separate study by some of the authors [2].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

15B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Corrosion

Pages

1747-1753

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0383-1_228

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Thermal Wave Imaging of Disbonding and Corrosion on Aircraft

Seattle, WA

Thermal wave imaging is emerging as a strong competitor to conventional nondestructive aircraft inspection techniques. Its strengths are in its ability to do rapid, wide-area, contactless imaging to detect corrosion and disbonding. It readily lends itself to the inspection of both metallic and composite aircraft structures. Recently [1], we have described the evolution of thermal wave hardware, and the role of the FAA’s NDI Validation Center in that evolution. In this report, we provide illustrative thermal wave images which show corrosion and disbonding on the B737 testbed aircraft at the NDI Validation Center. By showing sequences of images at successive times after the pulse-heating of the aircraft surface, we show that the greatest detail of subsurface corrosion occurs at very early times, thus mandating the use of rapid imaging techniques. More detailed laboratory studies confirming this conclusion are provided in a separate study by some of the authors [2].