Location

Seattle, WA

Start Date

1-1-1996 12:00 AM

Description

The complicated morphology of the new generation of advanced fibrous composites gave further impetus to the study of the interaction of ultrasonic waves with multilayered concentric cylindrical systems. Typically, the fiber consists of a cylindrical core embedded in a cladding region followed by a distinct interface zone separating the fiber system from the host (matrix) region. In addition, the cladding region itself often consists of subregions which can be identified as distinct layers. Each individual layer can posses certain degree of microscopic anisotropy adding to the macroscopic anisotropy produced by the presence of layering and imperfect interfaces. Relatively few efforts have been spent upon the study of free and immersed homogeneous anisotropic rods [1–5]. These works are insufficient to model real situations encountered in materials characterization of advanced fibrous composites. In order to better model advanced fibrous composites at least three major effects need to be accounted for. These are the inhomogeneous nature of the structure as reflected in its multilayering, the inherent microscopic anisotropy of some of the constituents and finally the quality of the interfaces. In this paper we briefly describe a unified analytical treatment of wave propagation along the fiber direction of multilayered coaxial fibrous systems embedded in a host material. A more detailed discussion of this general treatment will be presented elsewhere [6]. Figure 1 shows typical geometric situations including (a) a single multilayered fiber, (b) a single multilayered fiber either immersed in an infinite fluid or embedded in an infinite solid, and an infinite composite material with periodically distributed multilayered fiber.

Volume

15A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Standard Techniques

Section

UT Guided Wave Propagation

Pages

275-282

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0383-1_35

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Axisymmetric Waves in Layered Anisotropic Fibers and Composites

Seattle, WA

The complicated morphology of the new generation of advanced fibrous composites gave further impetus to the study of the interaction of ultrasonic waves with multilayered concentric cylindrical systems. Typically, the fiber consists of a cylindrical core embedded in a cladding region followed by a distinct interface zone separating the fiber system from the host (matrix) region. In addition, the cladding region itself often consists of subregions which can be identified as distinct layers. Each individual layer can posses certain degree of microscopic anisotropy adding to the macroscopic anisotropy produced by the presence of layering and imperfect interfaces. Relatively few efforts have been spent upon the study of free and immersed homogeneous anisotropic rods [1–5]. These works are insufficient to model real situations encountered in materials characterization of advanced fibrous composites. In order to better model advanced fibrous composites at least three major effects need to be accounted for. These are the inhomogeneous nature of the structure as reflected in its multilayering, the inherent microscopic anisotropy of some of the constituents and finally the quality of the interfaces. In this paper we briefly describe a unified analytical treatment of wave propagation along the fiber direction of multilayered coaxial fibrous systems embedded in a host material. A more detailed discussion of this general treatment will be presented elsewhere [6]. Figure 1 shows typical geometric situations including (a) a single multilayered fiber, (b) a single multilayered fiber either immersed in an infinite fluid or embedded in an infinite solid, and an infinite composite material with periodically distributed multilayered fiber.