Location

Seattle, WA

Start Date

1-1-1996 12:00 AM

Description

An important characteristic of any scintillator is its temporal response to an impulse of radiation. Ideally, the response time for the induced luminescence is much shorter than the time interval between data acquisitions. As the response time approaches this time interval blurring results in the acquired images. The presence of a long secondary decay component is typically referred to as afterglow. In order to avoid conditions under which such blurring may occur, a study of the scintillator’s temporal characteristics is required. This is especially important for x-ray computerized tomography where an object is constantly in motion.

Volume

15A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Standard Techniques

Section

Radiography and Computed Tomography

Pages

457-463

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0383-1_58

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Temporal Response of Terbium Glass Scintillator Used for X-Ray Tomography and Radiography

Seattle, WA

An important characteristic of any scintillator is its temporal response to an impulse of radiation. Ideally, the response time for the induced luminescence is much shorter than the time interval between data acquisitions. As the response time approaches this time interval blurring results in the acquired images. The presence of a long secondary decay component is typically referred to as afterglow. In order to avoid conditions under which such blurring may occur, a study of the scintillator’s temporal characteristics is required. This is especially important for x-ray computerized tomography where an object is constantly in motion.