Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1997 12:00 AM

Description

General Electric developed a new eddy current probe technology in the early ‘90’s to address critical NDE needs in the aerospace industry. The technology utilizes lasers to trace out precise, multiple turn coils on a flexible substrate. The result is an eddy current probe that is capable of conforming to complex geometries and inspecting with a very high detection sensitivity. To cover large areas quickly, arrays of these coils were also fabricated and are currently in use with great success at GE inspection facilities. The newly developed probes, however, raised some unique questions and problems that needed to be addressed in order to determine the“best” probe configuration. In this paper we summarize these issues and through a combination of experimental and finite element results, we show how the design of the probe is“optimized” for various applications. Further details on the development of the technology are provided in a companion paper in these proceedings[1].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

16A

Chapter

Chapter 4: NDE Sensors

Section

Electromagnetic Probes

Pages

973-980

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5947-4_127

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Optimizing the Design of Multilayer Eddy Current Probes — A Theoretical and Experimental Study

Brunswick, ME

General Electric developed a new eddy current probe technology in the early ‘90’s to address critical NDE needs in the aerospace industry. The technology utilizes lasers to trace out precise, multiple turn coils on a flexible substrate. The result is an eddy current probe that is capable of conforming to complex geometries and inspecting with a very high detection sensitivity. To cover large areas quickly, arrays of these coils were also fabricated and are currently in use with great success at GE inspection facilities. The newly developed probes, however, raised some unique questions and problems that needed to be addressed in order to determine the“best” probe configuration. In this paper we summarize these issues and through a combination of experimental and finite element results, we show how the design of the probe is“optimized” for various applications. Further details on the development of the technology are provided in a companion paper in these proceedings[1].