Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1997 12:00 AM

Description

Superconductive quantum interference devices (SQUIDS), patterned in copper oxide superconductor, offer new technology for eddy current evaluation of materials using pulsed currents. Their high sensitivity at low frequency1 enables penetration of 15 mm or so of aluminum, through multiple layers, to identify millimeter fatigue cracks and material loss of a few percent from corrosion in underlayers[1][2]. Pulsed eddy currents[3] provide a three dimensional view of defects in sublayers and enable tomographic sectioning of multilayer structures. Together with SQUIDS, they would give an ELECTROMAGNETIC MICROSCOPE for examining fatigue damage and corrosion in underlayers of structures.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

16A

Chapter

Chapter 4: NDE Sensors

Section

Electromagnetic Probes

Pages

1037-1044

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5947-4_135

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Electromagnetic Microscope for Deep, Pulsed, Eddy Current Inspections

Brunswick, ME

Superconductive quantum interference devices (SQUIDS), patterned in copper oxide superconductor, offer new technology for eddy current evaluation of materials using pulsed currents. Their high sensitivity at low frequency1 enables penetration of 15 mm or so of aluminum, through multiple layers, to identify millimeter fatigue cracks and material loss of a few percent from corrosion in underlayers[1][2]. Pulsed eddy currents[3] provide a three dimensional view of defects in sublayers and enable tomographic sectioning of multilayer structures. Together with SQUIDS, they would give an ELECTROMAGNETIC MICROSCOPE for examining fatigue damage and corrosion in underlayers of structures.