Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1997 12:00 AM

Description

Fatigue would often cause serious damage in materials and fracture all of sudden[1]. In many studies, however, it has been investigated that the damage has gradually induced the change of material properties and led to final fracture. As a method to detect the progressive change, the ultrasonic technique has been widely applied over decades because of comparatively simple and easy instrumentation [2–6]. In these applications, the ultrasonic attenuation and velocity have been measured with contacting ultrasonic transducers. These measurements have shown that the attenuation increased linearly at first and rose rapidly at about 70–80 percent of fatigue life [4, 5]. However, it is considered the attenuation changes measured using a contacting transducers can’t exactly reflect the fatigue damage because the as-measured attenuation also includes the damping through the transducer, the couplant and the buffer, the reflection and transmission losses at the interface, and the energy leakage into the transducer.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

16B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Materials Characterization

Pages

1487-1494

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5947-4_193

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Monitoring of Fatigue Damage in Pure Copper with Electromagnetic Acoustic Resonance

Brunswick, ME

Fatigue would often cause serious damage in materials and fracture all of sudden[1]. In many studies, however, it has been investigated that the damage has gradually induced the change of material properties and led to final fracture. As a method to detect the progressive change, the ultrasonic technique has been widely applied over decades because of comparatively simple and easy instrumentation [2–6]. In these applications, the ultrasonic attenuation and velocity have been measured with contacting ultrasonic transducers. These measurements have shown that the attenuation increased linearly at first and rose rapidly at about 70–80 percent of fatigue life [4, 5]. However, it is considered the attenuation changes measured using a contacting transducers can’t exactly reflect the fatigue damage because the as-measured attenuation also includes the damping through the transducer, the couplant and the buffer, the reflection and transmission losses at the interface, and the energy leakage into the transducer.