Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1997 12:00 AM

Description

During ultrasonic inspection for flaws in engineering materials, it is important to understand the interactions between the inspecting beam and the microstructure in which flaws are embedded. It has been found that in certain materials such interactions can have dramatic effects on the characteristics of the beam as it propagates to and from a flaw and consequently can have deleterious effects on both flaw characterization and the probability of detection. It is well known that, the microstructure can backscatter energy, creating noise which can mask small flaws. In addition, a flaw signal can be attenuated by the removal of energy from the beam by absorption and scattering. Considerable progress has been made towards developing a theoretical understanding of these phenomena. For example, backscattered grain noise has been successfully modeled by Han and Thompson [1] for duplex microstructures that commonly occur in Ti-17 and Ti-6A1-4V alloys used in the rotating components of aircraft engines. In addition, attenuation has been modeled for randomly oriented, equiaxed, cubic microstructures [2], for textured, equiaxed, cubic, stainless-steel [3], and also for elongated textured microstructures [4].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

16B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

UT Backscatter/Microstructure

Pages

1547-1554

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5947-4_201

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Observation and Interpretation of Microstructurally Induced Fluctuations of Back-Surface Signals and Ultrasonic Attenuation in Titanium Alloys

Brunswick, ME

During ultrasonic inspection for flaws in engineering materials, it is important to understand the interactions between the inspecting beam and the microstructure in which flaws are embedded. It has been found that in certain materials such interactions can have dramatic effects on the characteristics of the beam as it propagates to and from a flaw and consequently can have deleterious effects on both flaw characterization and the probability of detection. It is well known that, the microstructure can backscatter energy, creating noise which can mask small flaws. In addition, a flaw signal can be attenuated by the removal of energy from the beam by absorption and scattering. Considerable progress has been made towards developing a theoretical understanding of these phenomena. For example, backscattered grain noise has been successfully modeled by Han and Thompson [1] for duplex microstructures that commonly occur in Ti-17 and Ti-6A1-4V alloys used in the rotating components of aircraft engines. In addition, attenuation has been modeled for randomly oriented, equiaxed, cubic microstructures [2], for textured, equiaxed, cubic, stainless-steel [3], and also for elongated textured microstructures [4].