Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1997 12:00 AM

Description

The use of nondestructive techniques to characterize the microstructure of textured materials has been the subject of a great deal of research interest over the past fifty years [1]. While ultrasonic, radiographic and electron beam (EB) techniques have been developed for this purpose, all approaches suffer from critical shortcomings. X-ray and EB techniques are highly accurate but are limited to localized measurements of near surface orientation. Furthermore, these techniques are not useful for characterizing fiber reinforced polymer composites. Ultrasonic techniques for texture characterization have been developed, but they require some type of simplifying assumptions in order to be practically useful [2–5]. Typically, one assumes weak anisotropy or some type of symmetry (with known symmetry axes) in the textured microstructure. Here, a tensor based approach is utilized to minimize the initial assumptions necessary to obtain a useful solution.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

16B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Residual Stress and Texture

Pages

1707-1713

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5947-4_222

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

A Tensor Based Approach to the Ultrasonic Determination of Orientation Distribution

Brunswick, ME

The use of nondestructive techniques to characterize the microstructure of textured materials has been the subject of a great deal of research interest over the past fifty years [1]. While ultrasonic, radiographic and electron beam (EB) techniques have been developed for this purpose, all approaches suffer from critical shortcomings. X-ray and EB techniques are highly accurate but are limited to localized measurements of near surface orientation. Furthermore, these techniques are not useful for characterizing fiber reinforced polymer composites. Ultrasonic techniques for texture characterization have been developed, but they require some type of simplifying assumptions in order to be practically useful [2–5]. Typically, one assumes weak anisotropy or some type of symmetry (with known symmetry axes) in the textured microstructure. Here, a tensor based approach is utilized to minimize the initial assumptions necessary to obtain a useful solution.