Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1997 12:00 AM

Description

Bridges with reinforcement corrosion problems are now under careful inspection in Taiwan. Costly maintenance programs are underway and raising serious safety concern. There are various engineering solutions to salt-induced corrosion. Among them epoxy-coated reinforcing bars, commonly referred to as rebar, are frequently used in marine environment and other areas due to its durability, reasonable cost, and convenience. However, coated rebar has lower bond strength and is less ductile than uncoated rebar. Thus it could result in larger crack width during pull-out tests [1,2]. The bond strength between coated steel bars and covered concrete results from the adhesion at the steel-concrete boundary, the factional force, and the interlocking force provided by the raised ribs at the steel bar surface. The interlocking force is much stronger than the other two, while the factional force occurs only if the adhesion vanishes after delamination or disbonding starts.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

16B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Construction Materials (Concrete, Timber)

Pages

1755-1759

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5947-4_229

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Acoustic Inspection of Coated Steel Bar in Reinforced Concrete Structure

Brunswick, ME

Bridges with reinforcement corrosion problems are now under careful inspection in Taiwan. Costly maintenance programs are underway and raising serious safety concern. There are various engineering solutions to salt-induced corrosion. Among them epoxy-coated reinforcing bars, commonly referred to as rebar, are frequently used in marine environment and other areas due to its durability, reasonable cost, and convenience. However, coated rebar has lower bond strength and is less ductile than uncoated rebar. Thus it could result in larger crack width during pull-out tests [1,2]. The bond strength between coated steel bars and covered concrete results from the adhesion at the steel-concrete boundary, the factional force, and the interlocking force provided by the raised ribs at the steel bar surface. The interlocking force is much stronger than the other two, while the factional force occurs only if the adhesion vanishes after delamination or disbonding starts.