Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1997 12:00 AM

Description

Concrete is an extremely versatile building material. It is being used extensively as a building material for defense and civilian structures and infrastructure. In defense applications, concrete is often used as the primary structural component in facilities that are hardened against enemy attack, especially projectiles that can impact the structure with a high rate of speed and a large explosive force. The high strain and strain rate of such an event make it imperative to know the mechanical behavior of concrete at these elevated loads in order to properly design the appropriate weapons that can penetrate such structures, or, conversely for defensive purposes, design the structure to withstand and survive such an event. Similar conditions can occur in the civilian sector. Depending on the geographical location of these structures, they can be exposed to similar conditions as some of the defense facilities. For example, an earthquake is typically composed of several different types of shock waves [1]. The exact nature of the shock waves is dependent on the nature of the earthquake source.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

16B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Construction Materials (Concrete, Timber)

Pages

1767-1774

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5947-4_231

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

An Improved Technique for Determining the Equation of State of Concrete and Geological Materials

Brunswick, ME

Concrete is an extremely versatile building material. It is being used extensively as a building material for defense and civilian structures and infrastructure. In defense applications, concrete is often used as the primary structural component in facilities that are hardened against enemy attack, especially projectiles that can impact the structure with a high rate of speed and a large explosive force. The high strain and strain rate of such an event make it imperative to know the mechanical behavior of concrete at these elevated loads in order to properly design the appropriate weapons that can penetrate such structures, or, conversely for defensive purposes, design the structure to withstand and survive such an event. Similar conditions can occur in the civilian sector. Depending on the geographical location of these structures, they can be exposed to similar conditions as some of the defense facilities. For example, an earthquake is typically composed of several different types of shock waves [1]. The exact nature of the shock waves is dependent on the nature of the earthquake source.