Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1997 12:00 AM

Description

Components made from advanced ceramics materials find widespread use in many industrial and military applications. However, the presence of defects in the bulk and on the surface of the ceramic parts can alter their operation and lead to a reduced lifetime or a catastrophic failure. These defects may include various inclusions, inherent powder defects, poorly distributed second phase material, as well as voids and cracks. They can be introduced at each stage of the manufacturing process. Near-surface defects are particularly critical in many applications since the stresses in this region of the ceramic component are greatest during the operation. These flaws may be intrinsic to the bulk material or can be introduced in the final stages of fabrication (e.g. machining, grinding and polishing). Additionally, in composite ceramics defects can appear as a delamination of internal layers. Because the potential market for ceramic components is so large, a considerable effort has been put into developing non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect flaws at various stages of the manufacturing process [1–5].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

16B

Chapter

Chapter 7: New Inspection Procedures

Section

New Techniques

Pages

1961-1967

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5947-4_256

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Depth-Resolved Subsurface Defect Detection in Ceramics Using Optical Gating Techniques

Brunswick, ME

Components made from advanced ceramics materials find widespread use in many industrial and military applications. However, the presence of defects in the bulk and on the surface of the ceramic parts can alter their operation and lead to a reduced lifetime or a catastrophic failure. These defects may include various inclusions, inherent powder defects, poorly distributed second phase material, as well as voids and cracks. They can be introduced at each stage of the manufacturing process. Near-surface defects are particularly critical in many applications since the stresses in this region of the ceramic component are greatest during the operation. These flaws may be intrinsic to the bulk material or can be introduced in the final stages of fabrication (e.g. machining, grinding and polishing). Additionally, in composite ceramics defects can appear as a delamination of internal layers. Because the potential market for ceramic components is so large, a considerable effort has been put into developing non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect flaws at various stages of the manufacturing process [1–5].