Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1997 12:00 AM

Description

Pulse-echo thermal wave imaging is accomplished using a pulsed heat source (usually high-power flash lamps), an infrared (IR) video camera, and image processing hardware and software, all of which is controlled by a personal computer. The system has been described in detail elsewhere. [1,2] Figure 1 shows the thermal wave imaging system in operation at the FAA’s Aging Aircraft NDI Validation Center (AANC). As can seen from Fig. 1, the imaging head is hand-held. The computer, power supplies, etc., are located some distance away at the end of a fifty-foot long cable, the other end of which can be seen attached to the imaging head in Fig. 1. This same cable also carries the power for the flashlamps and the control signals from the computer. To make an image, the imaging head is held in place for three seconds. During this time, the flashlamps are fired, and a sequence of images is acquired and transferred to the computer’s hard disk. The head can then be moved to the next area to be imaged. An area of approximately a square foot is imaged at each flash by the system, so that wide areas of the aircraft can be covered very rapidly.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

16A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Standard Techniques

Section

Thermal Waves

Pages

353-356

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5947-4_46

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Quantitative Thermal Wave Imaging of Corrosion on Aircraft

Brunswick, ME

Pulse-echo thermal wave imaging is accomplished using a pulsed heat source (usually high-power flash lamps), an infrared (IR) video camera, and image processing hardware and software, all of which is controlled by a personal computer. The system has been described in detail elsewhere. [1,2] Figure 1 shows the thermal wave imaging system in operation at the FAA’s Aging Aircraft NDI Validation Center (AANC). As can seen from Fig. 1, the imaging head is hand-held. The computer, power supplies, etc., are located some distance away at the end of a fifty-foot long cable, the other end of which can be seen attached to the imaging head in Fig. 1. This same cable also carries the power for the flashlamps and the control signals from the computer. To make an image, the imaging head is held in place for three seconds. During this time, the flashlamps are fired, and a sequence of images is acquired and transferred to the computer’s hard disk. The head can then be moved to the next area to be imaged. An area of approximately a square foot is imaged at each flash by the system, so that wide areas of the aircraft can be covered very rapidly.