Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1997 12:00 AM

Description

The important benefits of quantitative nondestructive evaluation can be realized by a manufacturer if the system is fully compatible with the manufacturing environment and cost effective. In many cases an in-line real-time process control would be desirable. There have been a variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques which have successfully met the aforementioned conditions. These techniques are able to capitalize on a large body of established ultrasonic methods and signal analysis. However, there are environments and processes which cannot use these conventional procedures because they require the part under inspection to be either in physical contact with the transducer, via an epoxy, gel or fluid couplant, or maintained in close proximity to the transducers. These requirements may not be compatible with processes in which the part is at elevated temperatures, incompatible with the fluid couplant, physically remote or moving in a manner which adversely effects the required spacing. We present a robust ultrasonic technique which can work in these environments utilizing a laser-based ultrasound sensor incorporating photo-induced emf detection and a time-delay interferometer.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

16A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Emerging Inspection Technologies

Section

Laser Based Ultrasonics

Pages

579-586

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5947-4_76

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Robust Laser-Based Ultrasound Sensor Using Integrated Photo-Induced EMF Detection and Time-Delay Interferometer

Brunswick, ME

The important benefits of quantitative nondestructive evaluation can be realized by a manufacturer if the system is fully compatible with the manufacturing environment and cost effective. In many cases an in-line real-time process control would be desirable. There have been a variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques which have successfully met the aforementioned conditions. These techniques are able to capitalize on a large body of established ultrasonic methods and signal analysis. However, there are environments and processes which cannot use these conventional procedures because they require the part under inspection to be either in physical contact with the transducer, via an epoxy, gel or fluid couplant, or maintained in close proximity to the transducers. These requirements may not be compatible with processes in which the part is at elevated temperatures, incompatible with the fluid couplant, physically remote or moving in a manner which adversely effects the required spacing. We present a robust ultrasonic technique which can work in these environments utilizing a laser-based ultrasound sensor incorporating photo-induced emf detection and a time-delay interferometer.