Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1997 12:00 AM

Description

Microwave nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques offer an alternative to other conventional NDT methods. Microwave/millimeter wave techniques (which roughly cover 0.3 to 300 GHz) are particularly useful for examination of dielectric composite materials because their low dielectric losses provide good depth of penetration of electromagnetic radiation in this band [1–4]. Conventional NDT techniques, such as high-frequency ultrasonic testing (UT), are associated with limitations, e.g., large variations in elastic properties of low-density composite materials, that make interpretation of complex UT signals difficult. Furthermore, the criticality of coupling a transducer to a sample surface limits the use of such techniques for on-line applications. High-frequency microwave (millimeter waves, 30–300 GHz) systems, when compared to their low-frequency counterparts, offer higher resolution and sensitivity to variations in dielectric properties of low-loss composites. Moreover, higher frequencies allow utilization of more compact systems, which are often important for practical applications.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

16A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Emerging Inspection Technologies

Section

Microwave NDE

Pages

665-671

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5947-4_87

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Determining Bonding Quality in Polymer Composites with a Millimeter Wave Sensor

Brunswick, ME

Microwave nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques offer an alternative to other conventional NDT methods. Microwave/millimeter wave techniques (which roughly cover 0.3 to 300 GHz) are particularly useful for examination of dielectric composite materials because their low dielectric losses provide good depth of penetration of electromagnetic radiation in this band [1–4]. Conventional NDT techniques, such as high-frequency ultrasonic testing (UT), are associated with limitations, e.g., large variations in elastic properties of low-density composite materials, that make interpretation of complex UT signals difficult. Furthermore, the criticality of coupling a transducer to a sample surface limits the use of such techniques for on-line applications. High-frequency microwave (millimeter waves, 30–300 GHz) systems, when compared to their low-frequency counterparts, offer higher resolution and sensitivity to variations in dielectric properties of low-loss composites. Moreover, higher frequencies allow utilization of more compact systems, which are often important for practical applications.