Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1998 12:00 AM

Description

In the elastic property characterization of composite laminates with liquid-coupled ultrasound, the stiffnesses that are most easily and accurately measured in conventional single-sided reflection geometries are those of least interest to structural design engineers. Typical elastic wave measurements produce detailed maps of out-of-plane longitudinal stiffnesses, average laminate shear constants, and even mixed stiffnesses, such as C 13, C 23, etc, although these latter can be difficult to infer accurately [1]–[6]. (Further background on this topic can be found in recent reviews [7], [8].) This portion of the stiffness matrix is, however, of relatively little interest to most designers of composite structure. Of far greater interest is the longitudinal in-plane stiffness, since this property controls the effect of tensile and compressive forces on the laminate structure. Additionally, the laminate bending stiffness is another useful material property, but in this paper we concentrate on measuring the in-plane longitudinal stiffnessC 11.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

17B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Engineered Materials

Section

Composites

Pages

1139-1146

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5339-7_147

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

In-Plane Elastic Property Characterization in Composite Plates

La Jolla, CA

In the elastic property characterization of composite laminates with liquid-coupled ultrasound, the stiffnesses that are most easily and accurately measured in conventional single-sided reflection geometries are those of least interest to structural design engineers. Typical elastic wave measurements produce detailed maps of out-of-plane longitudinal stiffnesses, average laminate shear constants, and even mixed stiffnesses, such as C 13, C 23, etc, although these latter can be difficult to infer accurately [1]–[6]. (Further background on this topic can be found in recent reviews [7], [8].) This portion of the stiffness matrix is, however, of relatively little interest to most designers of composite structure. Of far greater interest is the longitudinal in-plane stiffness, since this property controls the effect of tensile and compressive forces on the laminate structure. Additionally, the laminate bending stiffness is another useful material property, but in this paper we concentrate on measuring the in-plane longitudinal stiffnessC 11.