Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1998 12:00 AM

Description

Transient liquid phase bonding (TLPB) is an effective means for joining high performance metal components. It differs from welding and conventional brazing in that it produces very little chemical segregation or microstructural demarcation at the bond-line. The method of transient liquid phase bonding was originally developed in the 1970’s [1] and has been used in the joining of titanium and nickel based superalloy components. In this method, a bonding alloy containing a melting point suppressing element is sandwiched between the parent metals to be joined. The temperature is raised to a point where the bonding alloy melts but the parent metals remain solid. The melting point suppressing element then diffuses away from the bondline, thus raising the melting point and solidifying the bond. Since the temperature never exceeds the melting point of the parent metal, single crystals may be joined without destroying their crystalline structure.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

17B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Engineered Materials

Section

Coatings, Films and Bond

Pages

1363-1370

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5339-7_176

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Ultrasonic Evaluation of Transient Liquid Phase Bonding in Single Crystal Superalloy Castings

La Jolla, CA

Transient liquid phase bonding (TLPB) is an effective means for joining high performance metal components. It differs from welding and conventional brazing in that it produces very little chemical segregation or microstructural demarcation at the bond-line. The method of transient liquid phase bonding was originally developed in the 1970’s [1] and has been used in the joining of titanium and nickel based superalloy components. In this method, a bonding alloy containing a melting point suppressing element is sandwiched between the parent metals to be joined. The temperature is raised to a point where the bonding alloy melts but the parent metals remain solid. The melting point suppressing element then diffuses away from the bondline, thus raising the melting point and solidifying the bond. Since the temperature never exceeds the melting point of the parent metal, single crystals may be joined without destroying their crystalline structure.