Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1998 12:00 AM

Description

Spatial resolution is an important factor in ultrasonic materials characterization. Scanning acoustic microscopy [1–2] has proved to be a useful tool for materials evaluation with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. Point-focus-beam (PFB) acoustic microscopy has high spatial resolution and is often used to produce images as well as to probe material inhomogeneity. However, a disadvantage of the PFB technique lies in its insensitivity to material anisotropy. In contrast, line-focus-beam (LFB) acoustic microscopy can provide a directional ultrasonic velocity measurement and is employed for characterization of anisotropic materials [3–5]. But the LFB technique, with its unidirectional spatial resolution, is generally incapable of producing images, and is therefore disadvantageous for probing inhomogeneous materials. In response to this need, a variety of lens designs [6–9] in acoustic microscopy have been proposed for measuring materials, which are both inhomogeneous and anisotropic.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

17B

Chapter

Chapter 7: New Inspection/Control Procedures

Section

New Techniques

Pages

1737-1744

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5339-7_225

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Spatial Resolution with Time-and-Polarization-Resolved Acoustic Microscopy

La Jolla, CA

Spatial resolution is an important factor in ultrasonic materials characterization. Scanning acoustic microscopy [1–2] has proved to be a useful tool for materials evaluation with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. Point-focus-beam (PFB) acoustic microscopy has high spatial resolution and is often used to produce images as well as to probe material inhomogeneity. However, a disadvantage of the PFB technique lies in its insensitivity to material anisotropy. In contrast, line-focus-beam (LFB) acoustic microscopy can provide a directional ultrasonic velocity measurement and is employed for characterization of anisotropic materials [3–5]. But the LFB technique, with its unidirectional spatial resolution, is generally incapable of producing images, and is therefore disadvantageous for probing inhomogeneous materials. In response to this need, a variety of lens designs [6–9] in acoustic microscopy have been proposed for measuring materials, which are both inhomogeneous and anisotropic.