Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1998 12:00 AM

Description

Recently, computer models of inspection processes are emerging as important simulation tools in many aspects of applications of nondestructive evaluation. This work reports one such application to the design of test samples for studying the detection of hardalpha inclusions in titanium alloys. The infrequent occurrence of natural hard-alpha defects has necessitated extensive use of synthetic-hard-alpha (SHA) test samples. However, in manufacturing these titanium test samples, the traditional “trial and error” practice has proven to be costly and time-consuming. The current goal of designing a block simulating a titanium billet containing numerous SHA defects, with properties approximating those of natural hard-alpha defects, presents an even more complex challenge.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

17B

Chapter

Chapter 8: Systems, Reliability, Training

Section

System Reliability

Pages

2069-2076

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5339-7_268

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

The Use of Ultrasonic Flaw and Noise Models in Designing Titanium Test Blocks

La Jolla, CA

Recently, computer models of inspection processes are emerging as important simulation tools in many aspects of applications of nondestructive evaluation. This work reports one such application to the design of test samples for studying the detection of hardalpha inclusions in titanium alloys. The infrequent occurrence of natural hard-alpha defects has necessitated extensive use of synthetic-hard-alpha (SHA) test samples. However, in manufacturing these titanium test samples, the traditional “trial and error” practice has proven to be costly and time-consuming. The current goal of designing a block simulating a titanium billet containing numerous SHA defects, with properties approximating those of natural hard-alpha defects, presents an even more complex challenge.