Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1998 12:00 AM

Description

The remote field eddy current (RFEC) effect was first observed when an alternating current was applied to a coil inside a metallic pipe. It is characterized by the energy released from an excitation coil which propagates twice through the tube/pipe wall under inspection before it reaches the pick-up coils/sensors located 2–3 diameters away from the excitation. This technique is routinely used for metallic tube inspection. Distinguishing features include high and equal sensitivity to both OD and ID defects, independence of phase signals to lift-off, approximately linear signal phase to thickness relationship, no restriction with regard to penetration depth, and detection depending on signal-to-noise ratio only. There are also some disadvantages associated with the RFEC technique, primarily, high power requirements and large separation distances between the excitation and sensor coils.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

17A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Standard Techniques

Section

Eddy Currents

Pages

259-266

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5339-7_33

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Finite Element Simulation of Pulsed Remote Field Eddy Current Phenomenon

La Jolla, CA

The remote field eddy current (RFEC) effect was first observed when an alternating current was applied to a coil inside a metallic pipe. It is characterized by the energy released from an excitation coil which propagates twice through the tube/pipe wall under inspection before it reaches the pick-up coils/sensors located 2–3 diameters away from the excitation. This technique is routinely used for metallic tube inspection. Distinguishing features include high and equal sensitivity to both OD and ID defects, independence of phase signals to lift-off, approximately linear signal phase to thickness relationship, no restriction with regard to penetration depth, and detection depending on signal-to-noise ratio only. There are also some disadvantages associated with the RFEC technique, primarily, high power requirements and large separation distances between the excitation and sensor coils.