Presenter Information

E. Rhian Green, Leicester University

Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1998 12:00 AM

Description

The stress states which arise in fiber composite laminates under in-service conditions can give rise to a wide variety of local defects and microfractures whilst the laminate still preserves its structural integrity. In any attempt to assess the remaining life of the structure it is necessary to determine the nature and location of these damage events and to monitor the subsequent growth of the defects. Both the onset and the growth of the defects lead to the release of elastic stored energy which gives rise to acoustic emission signals. These signals can be recorded as transient disturbances on the surface of the structure and the nature of these disturbances depends on the location of the source, the character of the damage event and the time history of the energy release, as well as on the mode of propagation of elastic waves through the laminate. The inverse problem of locating and classifying the nature of the source event from the recorded surface disturbance is a formidable task, which requires a detailed knowledge of the propagation of stress waves through the laminate due to a range of sources with known characteristics, located at a specified internal position.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

17A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Standard Techniques

Section

Acoustic Emission and Applications

Pages

533-540

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5339-7_69

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

The Effect of Rise Times on the Response of Fiber Composite Laminates to Dislocation Sources

La Jolla, CA

The stress states which arise in fiber composite laminates under in-service conditions can give rise to a wide variety of local defects and microfractures whilst the laminate still preserves its structural integrity. In any attempt to assess the remaining life of the structure it is necessary to determine the nature and location of these damage events and to monitor the subsequent growth of the defects. Both the onset and the growth of the defects lead to the release of elastic stored energy which gives rise to acoustic emission signals. These signals can be recorded as transient disturbances on the surface of the structure and the nature of these disturbances depends on the location of the source, the character of the damage event and the time history of the energy release, as well as on the mode of propagation of elastic waves through the laminate. The inverse problem of locating and classifying the nature of the source event from the recorded surface disturbance is a formidable task, which requires a detailed knowledge of the propagation of stress waves through the laminate due to a range of sources with known characteristics, located at a specified internal position.