Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1998 12:00 AM

Description

By relying on optics for providing the transduction of ultrasound, laser-ultrasonics brings practical solutions to a variety of nondestructive evaluation problems that cannot be solved by using conventional ultrasonic techniques based on piezoelectric transduction [1,2]. Laser-ultrasonics uses two lasers, one with a short pulse for the generation of ultrasound and another one, long pulse or continuous, coupled to an optical interferometer for detection. Laser-ultrasonics allows for testing at a large standoff distance, inspection of moving parts on production lines and inspection in hostile environments, such as the one encountered in the steel industry. The technique features also a large detection bandwidth, which is important for numerous applications, particularly involving material characterization. Another feature of laser-ultrasonics, particularly useful for inspecting parts of complex shapes, is the generation of an acoustic wave propagating normally to the surface, independently of the shape of the part and of the incidence angle of the optical generation beam. This characteristic feature occurs either when the ablation mechanism is used for generation or when light from the generation laser penetrates sufficiently deep below the surface. This last condition occurs usually with many polymer-based materials and on materials with painted surfaces.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

17A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Emerging Technologies

Section

Laser/Optical Ultrasonics

Pages

611-617

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5339-7_79

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

SAFT Data Processing Applied to Laser-Ultrasonic Inspection

La Jolla, CA

By relying on optics for providing the transduction of ultrasound, laser-ultrasonics brings practical solutions to a variety of nondestructive evaluation problems that cannot be solved by using conventional ultrasonic techniques based on piezoelectric transduction [1,2]. Laser-ultrasonics uses two lasers, one with a short pulse for the generation of ultrasound and another one, long pulse or continuous, coupled to an optical interferometer for detection. Laser-ultrasonics allows for testing at a large standoff distance, inspection of moving parts on production lines and inspection in hostile environments, such as the one encountered in the steel industry. The technique features also a large detection bandwidth, which is important for numerous applications, particularly involving material characterization. Another feature of laser-ultrasonics, particularly useful for inspecting parts of complex shapes, is the generation of an acoustic wave propagating normally to the surface, independently of the shape of the part and of the incidence angle of the optical generation beam. This characteristic feature occurs either when the ablation mechanism is used for generation or when light from the generation laser penetrates sufficiently deep below the surface. This last condition occurs usually with many polymer-based materials and on materials with painted surfaces.