Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1998 12:00 AM

Description

The principles and uses of optical techniques for the generation and detection of ultrasound have been discussed extensively in the literature. Several excellent reviews of the progress in the field of laser ultrasonics are available [1–3]. Laser ultrasonic techniques have several advantages over other inspection methods, making them an attractive option for select applications. Unfortunately, poor sensitivity and high cost of laser ultrasonic systems are currently limiting industrial application. In general, implementation is limited to situations where laser inspection methods present the only available solution, or the few cases that prove cost effective. The goal of the current work is to increase the sensitivity of optical generation and detection systems. The work focuses on the laser/materials interaction that occurs during the generation of ultrasonic waves, and considers a number of methods by which laser ultrasonic systems can achieve greater sensitivity through control of the laser generation source.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

17A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Emerging Technologies

Section

Laser/Optical Ultrasonics

Pages

619-625

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5339-7_80

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Thermoelastic and Ablative Generation of Ultrasound: Source Effects

La Jolla, CA

The principles and uses of optical techniques for the generation and detection of ultrasound have been discussed extensively in the literature. Several excellent reviews of the progress in the field of laser ultrasonics are available [1–3]. Laser ultrasonic techniques have several advantages over other inspection methods, making them an attractive option for select applications. Unfortunately, poor sensitivity and high cost of laser ultrasonic systems are currently limiting industrial application. In general, implementation is limited to situations where laser inspection methods present the only available solution, or the few cases that prove cost effective. The goal of the current work is to increase the sensitivity of optical generation and detection systems. The work focuses on the laser/materials interaction that occurs during the generation of ultrasonic waves, and considers a number of methods by which laser ultrasonic systems can achieve greater sensitivity through control of the laser generation source.