Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1998 12:00 AM

Description

There is a need in myriad manufacturing environments to nondestructively evaluate components and to control processes in real-time. Laser-based ultrasound [1,2], LBU, has the potential to be a robust, reconfigurable, noncontact diagnostic for many industrial applications. A simple and inexpensive semiconductor sensor based on the nonsteady-state photo-induced-electromotive force (photo-emf) effect [3,4], has been demonstrated [5] to be functional under a variety of manufacturing conditions and in probing various materials, including metals, semiconductors, and organics. This device has the potential to remotely sense ultrasound via speckle motion or coherent detection over a reasonable field-of-view, with good bandwidth and detection sensitivity. In addition, the detector can, at the same time, compensate for otherwise deleterious static and dynamic environmental distortions in real-time, including speckle, beam wander, poor-quality optics, and propagation distortions over free-space paths and through multi-mode optical fibers. Such inspection tools can improve the efficiency, yield and performance of various manufacturing processes, including bonds, surface treatments, case hardening, composites, metallurgy, microcrack detection, adhesion, remote temperature and thickness measurements. By performing the inspection on-line and in real-time, the possibility exists for closed-loop, in-process control. This can lead to reduced cost, labor, scrap, and machine downtime in today’s highly competitive markets.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

17A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Emerging Technologies

Section

Laser/Optical Ultrasonics

Pages

627-634

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5339-7_81

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Characterization of the Photo-emf Response for Laser-Based Ultrasonic Sensing Under Simulated Industrial Conditions

La Jolla, CA

There is a need in myriad manufacturing environments to nondestructively evaluate components and to control processes in real-time. Laser-based ultrasound [1,2], LBU, has the potential to be a robust, reconfigurable, noncontact diagnostic for many industrial applications. A simple and inexpensive semiconductor sensor based on the nonsteady-state photo-induced-electromotive force (photo-emf) effect [3,4], has been demonstrated [5] to be functional under a variety of manufacturing conditions and in probing various materials, including metals, semiconductors, and organics. This device has the potential to remotely sense ultrasound via speckle motion or coherent detection over a reasonable field-of-view, with good bandwidth and detection sensitivity. In addition, the detector can, at the same time, compensate for otherwise deleterious static and dynamic environmental distortions in real-time, including speckle, beam wander, poor-quality optics, and propagation distortions over free-space paths and through multi-mode optical fibers. Such inspection tools can improve the efficiency, yield and performance of various manufacturing processes, including bonds, surface treatments, case hardening, composites, metallurgy, microcrack detection, adhesion, remote temperature and thickness measurements. By performing the inspection on-line and in real-time, the possibility exists for closed-loop, in-process control. This can lead to reduced cost, labor, scrap, and machine downtime in today’s highly competitive markets.