Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1998 12:00 AM

Description

In the design of the eddy-current inspection systems that have been reported to be able to interpret EC data automatically one can distinguish use of two methodologies. One is the use of classifiers to assign the signals to several predefined defect classes. Another is the use of expert systems to reason about the shape and other parameters of the signals in order to determine the defect types they represent. Both sorts of systems are usually designed with a specific inspection type in mind (e.g. steam generators of nuclear power plants). Adapting these systems to a different inspection type requires a considerable effort; therefore, they are generally not suitable for application in (petro-) chemical industry where heat-exchanger types vary from one inspection to another. This paper suggests case-based reasoning (CBR) as a methodology which is well suited for s ach applications. In this respect, one of the most important advantages of CBR systems is their ability to leam during use.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

17A

Chapter

Chapter 3: Signal Processing and Image Analysis

Section

Signal Processing

Pages

767-774

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-5339-7_99

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Case-Based Reasoning for Automatic Interpretation of Data from Eddy-Current Inspection

La Jolla, CA

In the design of the eddy-current inspection systems that have been reported to be able to interpret EC data automatically one can distinguish use of two methodologies. One is the use of classifiers to assign the signals to several predefined defect classes. Another is the use of expert systems to reason about the shape and other parameters of the signals in order to determine the defect types they represent. Both sorts of systems are usually designed with a specific inspection type in mind (e.g. steam generators of nuclear power plants). Adapting these systems to a different inspection type requires a considerable effort; therefore, they are generally not suitable for application in (petro-) chemical industry where heat-exchanger types vary from one inspection to another. This paper suggests case-based reasoning (CBR) as a methodology which is well suited for s ach applications. In this respect, one of the most important advantages of CBR systems is their ability to leam during use.