Event Title

Use of an Electroacoustic Measurement Model for Ultrasonic Transducer Characterization

Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

Ultrasonic transducers are electromechanical devices that covert electrical inputs (voltage, current) into mechanical outputs (force, velocity) and vice-versa. To completely characterize the relationship between these four parameters in general requires knowledge of all the elements of a 2×2 complex-valued “transduction” matrix as a function of frequency. In the literature it has typically been assumed that to obtain all the elements of this transduction matrix it is necessary to perform a combination of both electrical and mechanical measurements (see Sachse and Hsu [1], for example), which makes such a complete characterization rather difficult and expensive. Here, we will show that, by using an electroacoustic measurement model that completely characterizes an entire ultrasonic measurement system, it is possible in principle to set up a practical measurement method where the complete transduction matrix can be obtained by purely electrical measurements at the electrical port of the transducer. Having a practical procedure to completely characterize an ultrasonic transducer is important since it will allow one to make quantitative estimates of the influence of the transducer properties on an ultrasonic measurement process.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18A

Chapter

Chapter 4: UT Transducers and Fields, Sensors

Section

UT Transducers Fields

Pages

1115-1122

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_142

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Use of an Electroacoustic Measurement Model for Ultrasonic Transducer Characterization

Snowbird, UT, USA

Ultrasonic transducers are electromechanical devices that covert electrical inputs (voltage, current) into mechanical outputs (force, velocity) and vice-versa. To completely characterize the relationship between these four parameters in general requires knowledge of all the elements of a 2×2 complex-valued “transduction” matrix as a function of frequency. In the literature it has typically been assumed that to obtain all the elements of this transduction matrix it is necessary to perform a combination of both electrical and mechanical measurements (see Sachse and Hsu [1], for example), which makes such a complete characterization rather difficult and expensive. Here, we will show that, by using an electroacoustic measurement model that completely characterizes an entire ultrasonic measurement system, it is possible in principle to set up a practical measurement method where the complete transduction matrix can be obtained by purely electrical measurements at the electrical port of the transducer. Having a practical procedure to completely characterize an ultrasonic transducer is important since it will allow one to make quantitative estimates of the influence of the transducer properties on an ultrasonic measurement process.