Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

New technological needs are leading to the development of new materials with enhanced mechanical properties for applications at elevated temperatures. The measurement of the elastic constants in such conditions is then needed. For that purpose, the LASER ultrasonic technique in which the ultrasonic waves are generated and detected at a distance, without any contact to the specimen [1] is used at elevated temperature. In this paper, the scanning of the surface of a specimen is performed to collect generated waveforms in various directions included in principal and non principal planes of symmetry of a composite material. Nine stiffness coefficients are thus identified from analysis performed on a single specimen. The method is applied at various elevated temperatures up to 300°C, and the stiffness tensor changes are discussed.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Engineered Materials

Section

Composites

Pages

1241-1247

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_159

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Measurement by Laser Generated Ultrasound of the Stiffness Tensor of an Anisotropic Material at Elevated Temperatures

Snowbird, UT, USA

New technological needs are leading to the development of new materials with enhanced mechanical properties for applications at elevated temperatures. The measurement of the elastic constants in such conditions is then needed. For that purpose, the LASER ultrasonic technique in which the ultrasonic waves are generated and detected at a distance, without any contact to the specimen [1] is used at elevated temperature. In this paper, the scanning of the surface of a specimen is performed to collect generated waveforms in various directions included in principal and non principal planes of symmetry of a composite material. Nine stiffness coefficients are thus identified from analysis performed on a single specimen. The method is applied at various elevated temperatures up to 300°C, and the stiffness tensor changes are discussed.