Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

Widespread adoption of process inspection is dependent on reduction of cost. In many applications the part geometry may not be known or may be sufficiently complex that it would be desirable to not follow all of the part contours. Fortunately, in cases where refraction of the wave between the coupling fluid and the part is low, relatively complex parts may be scanned without precisely following the part contours. This paper explores a problem where a complex part is scanned with a limited number of degrees of freedom in the scanning system. The close acoustic impedance match between the rubber part and the water coupling fluid allows this to be done efficiently. However, the refraction and attenuation of the wave in the material is still sufficiently high that it may be necessary to correct the amplitude of the received signal to account for the part geometry. Matrix propagator methods are used to create a model which will allow the effect of amplitude variation on the received signal to be explored for the curved specimen. The magnitude of the received signal will be adjusted to be equivalent to a normally incident wave.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Engineered Materials

Section

Composites

Pages

1305-1312

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_167

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Transmission Coefficient for Multi-Layered Structures at Arbitrary Incident Angle

Snowbird, UT, USA

Widespread adoption of process inspection is dependent on reduction of cost. In many applications the part geometry may not be known or may be sufficiently complex that it would be desirable to not follow all of the part contours. Fortunately, in cases where refraction of the wave between the coupling fluid and the part is low, relatively complex parts may be scanned without precisely following the part contours. This paper explores a problem where a complex part is scanned with a limited number of degrees of freedom in the scanning system. The close acoustic impedance match between the rubber part and the water coupling fluid allows this to be done efficiently. However, the refraction and attenuation of the wave in the material is still sufficiently high that it may be necessary to correct the amplitude of the received signal to account for the part geometry. Matrix propagator methods are used to create a model which will allow the effect of amplitude variation on the received signal to be explored for the curved specimen. The magnitude of the received signal will be adjusted to be equivalent to a normally incident wave.