Event Title

Acoustic Response of a Layer of Spherical Inclusions with a Hexagonal or Square Periodic Arrangement

Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

Starting with the work of Wolf [1], the scattering of a plane elastic wave by an isolated sphere embedded in an unbounded (or bounded) medium has been studied in great detail [2–3]. Similarly, the propagation of an effective elastic wave in an elastic matrix containing a random or periodic distribution of inclusions (particles, voids, cracks, etc.) has received considerable attention. The literature concerning these two problems is so extensive that its review is beyond the scope of this paper. By comparison, an intermediate level of microstructure, an elastic matrix containing a single layer of a random or periodic distribution of inclusions, has received very little attention. Although this problem is worth examining in its own right because of its inherent value as a canonical problem of elastodynamics of materials with microstructure, it also has applications in geophysics, quantitative nondestructive evaluation, and the design of ultrasound absorptive materials.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Elastic Waves and Ultrasonic Techniques

Section

Scattering/Propagation

Pages

143-150

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_17

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Acoustic Response of a Layer of Spherical Inclusions with a Hexagonal or Square Periodic Arrangement

Snowbird, UT, USA

Starting with the work of Wolf [1], the scattering of a plane elastic wave by an isolated sphere embedded in an unbounded (or bounded) medium has been studied in great detail [2–3]. Similarly, the propagation of an effective elastic wave in an elastic matrix containing a random or periodic distribution of inclusions (particles, voids, cracks, etc.) has received considerable attention. The literature concerning these two problems is so extensive that its review is beyond the scope of this paper. By comparison, an intermediate level of microstructure, an elastic matrix containing a single layer of a random or periodic distribution of inclusions, has received very little attention. Although this problem is worth examining in its own right because of its inherent value as a canonical problem of elastodynamics of materials with microstructure, it also has applications in geophysics, quantitative nondestructive evaluation, and the design of ultrasound absorptive materials.