Event Title

Long Range Lamb Wave Inspection: the Effect of Dispersion and Modal Selectivity

Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

Guided acoustic waves, such as Lamb waves, are highly attractive for the rapid inspection of plate and pipe-like [1–3] structures. However, guided wave inspection is more complicated than conventional bulk wave ultrasonic inspection, for two reasons in particular: the existence of multiple modes of wave propagation, and the generally dispersive nature of these modes [4]. In most successful applications of guided waves for long range testing, the bandwidth of the acoustic energy supplied to the system is constrained by using a signal such as a Hanning or Gaussian windowed toneburst. In conjunction with the transducer design, the use of limited bandwidth input signals can be used to suppress unwanted modes and limit dispersion in the desired mode [4].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Elastic Waves and Ultrasonic Techniques

Section

Guided Waves and Applications

Pages

151-158

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_18

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Long Range Lamb Wave Inspection: the Effect of Dispersion and Modal Selectivity

Snowbird, UT, USA

Guided acoustic waves, such as Lamb waves, are highly attractive for the rapid inspection of plate and pipe-like [1–3] structures. However, guided wave inspection is more complicated than conventional bulk wave ultrasonic inspection, for two reasons in particular: the existence of multiple modes of wave propagation, and the generally dispersive nature of these modes [4]. In most successful applications of guided waves for long range testing, the bandwidth of the acoustic energy supplied to the system is constrained by using a signal such as a Hanning or Gaussian windowed toneburst. In conjunction with the transducer design, the use of limited bandwidth input signals can be used to suppress unwanted modes and limit dispersion in the desired mode [4].