Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

Several factors have held back the more widespread use of adhesives. These principally are the detrimental effect of moisture on bond strength and also the lack of a suitable non-destructive testing technique for detecting strength loss due to environmental attack. It is the latter problem that this work attempts to answer. The focus of this work has been to look at the bonding of aluminium to aluminium using epoxy based adhesives, as would be used in the aerospace industry. Bonding of aluminium has been performed in the aerospace industry for many years, and there has been much work done to improve the durability of this type of joint. It has been seen that the improvement in corrosion resistance that can be achieved by treating aluminium prior to bonding has a significant effect on the durability of the bond produced. This is not surprising when it is often seen that a joint which has been exposed to a hot-wet environment will fail along the interface between the aluminium and epoxy, as opposed to through the adhesive when the joint has remained dry [1]. Therefore it is this interface region that is to be examined when searching for environmental attack. The most common form of pretreatment that is used when environmental attack is a concern is anodisation of the surface to be bonded. Anodising produces a thin oxide layer on the aluminium surface, typically 1 –3 μm thick. Joints that have been anodised are considerably more durable than joints that are not anodised, but they will still exhibit interfacial failure after exposure to hot-wet environments [1]. The problem for NDT techniques is that the oxide layer which we need to inspect is orders of magnitude smaller than the bounding layers; the aluminium being 1–5mm, and the adhesive being 0.1–0.5mm thick, as shown in Figure 1. Ultrasonics has appeared to be the most promising technique for inspecting for degradation of adhesive joints, and it is this technique on which we have concentrated our efforts [2–4].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Engineered Materials

Section

Coatings, Interfaces, and Bonds

Pages

1525-1532

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_196

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

The Correlation of Ultrasonic Measurements with Toughness Changes During the Environmental Degradation of Adhesive Joints

Snowbird, UT, USA

Several factors have held back the more widespread use of adhesives. These principally are the detrimental effect of moisture on bond strength and also the lack of a suitable non-destructive testing technique for detecting strength loss due to environmental attack. It is the latter problem that this work attempts to answer. The focus of this work has been to look at the bonding of aluminium to aluminium using epoxy based adhesives, as would be used in the aerospace industry. Bonding of aluminium has been performed in the aerospace industry for many years, and there has been much work done to improve the durability of this type of joint. It has been seen that the improvement in corrosion resistance that can be achieved by treating aluminium prior to bonding has a significant effect on the durability of the bond produced. This is not surprising when it is often seen that a joint which has been exposed to a hot-wet environment will fail along the interface between the aluminium and epoxy, as opposed to through the adhesive when the joint has remained dry [1]. Therefore it is this interface region that is to be examined when searching for environmental attack. The most common form of pretreatment that is used when environmental attack is a concern is anodisation of the surface to be bonded. Anodising produces a thin oxide layer on the aluminium surface, typically 1 –3 μm thick. Joints that have been anodised are considerably more durable than joints that are not anodised, but they will still exhibit interfacial failure after exposure to hot-wet environments [1]. The problem for NDT techniques is that the oxide layer which we need to inspect is orders of magnitude smaller than the bounding layers; the aluminium being 1–5mm, and the adhesive being 0.1–0.5mm thick, as shown in Figure 1. Ultrasonics has appeared to be the most promising technique for inspecting for degradation of adhesive joints, and it is this technique on which we have concentrated our efforts [2–4].